Good Oak

Leopold employs allegory to tell the history of Wisconsin since man began to change its complexion. He also tells the historians how to tell a story. Read “Good Oak” in A Sand County Almanac

Recent Posts

  • Round River Critique

    In compiling this set of his father’s essays, Luna Leopold, a geologist, chose to title the collection after one of the included pieces, “Round River.” In it, his father had used the legend of Paul Bunyan floating logs down the… Read More ›

  • Conservation

    Leopold waxes polemic in his call for an ethic based on environmental awareness. In the process he foresees the development of speciesism, green marketing, and environmental economics as dead ends along the road to a true environmental philosophy. Read “Conservation”… Read More ›

  • Natural History — The Forgotten Science

    In this essay, Leopold calls for a new course called ecology to be taught in our universities. That course is now ubiquitous, but what would he think of its syllabus? Read “Natural History — The Forgotten Science” in Round River… Read More ›

  • The Delta Colorado

    In the autumn of 1922, the Leopold brothers, Carl and Aldo, set out upon an expedition to hunt and explore the Colorado River delta south of the Mexican border. Both men made journal entries (Carl’s are identified by “C.S.L.”) with… Read More ›

  • A Man’s Leisure Time

    The tasks to which we devote ourselves when not otherwise occupied by the task of survival say a great deal about us as individuals and as a species. A hobby may, in fact, be all that separates us from the… Read More ›

  • Good Oak: Aldo Leopold

      THERE ARE TWO SPIRITUAL DANGERS IN NOT OWNING A FARM. ONE IS THE DANGER OF SUPPOSING THAT BREAKFAST COMES FROM THE GROCERY, AND THE OTHER THAT HEAT COMES FROM THE FURNACE. — Aldo Leopold (1887-1948) Flames licked lightly the… Read More ›

  • Rachel Carson’s Legacy — Anguilla

    Critics and historians usually refer to Rachel Carson as a nature writer first, and a scientist second. Indeed she gave us vivid descriptions of the sea and the life that indwells the oceans, but I believe her influence reaches far… Read More ›

  • Silent Spring Critique

    Silent Spring is a very tight argument against the indiscriminate and unregulated use of pesticides, especially insecticides, particularly DDT. Carson’s argument, in fact, is so tight, so well constructed, that the book is extremely difficult to excerpt without losing a… Read More ›

  • The Man at the Front

    Pierre Teilhard de Chardin:  Tests, Allies & Enemies It is a terrifying thing to have been born: I mean, to find oneself, without having willed it, swept irrevocably along on a torrent of fearful energy which seems as though it… Read More ›