philosophy

Silent Spring Critique

Silent Spring is a very tight argument against the indiscriminate and unregulated use of pesticides, especially insecticides, particularly DDT. Carson’s argument, in fact, is so tight, so well constructed, that the book is extremely difficult to excerpt without losing a… Read More ›

The Other Road

  Carson is nearly swept away in her veneration of poisons coming out of the biologist’s laboratory rather than the chemist’s — especially the andricides — but she recovers to emphasize natural, non-violent methods of insect control, finally leaving us… Read More ›

A Writer’s Credo

Abbey lays out the foundation of his philosophy as a writer in this no-holds-barred exhortation to stand up and state your convictions — tell us what you really think. Credo is Latin for “I believe.” What follows is the writer’s… Read More ›

The Monkey Wrench Gang Critique

The Monkey Wrench Gang is one of those rarities in literature: a novel that spawns a movement, literally comes to life. What William Gibson’s science fiction has done for cyberspace and virtual lives based on networked computing, Edward Abbey’s works… Read More ›

But Not Yet

St. Augustine and Refusal of the Call St. Augustine was born Aurelius Augustinus in Algeria, in the north of Africa, in the year of our Lord three hundred and fifty-four.  His understanding of the world, our relationship with God, and… Read More ›

DESERT SOLITAIRE Critique

Much to the surprise, even dismay, of its author, Desert Solitaire has lived to become Edward Abbey’s best loved book. First published in 1968, it temporarily lapsed into obscurity before revivification by Simon & Schuster in 1971. It has lain… Read More ›

Bedrock and Paradox

Night falls upon the Arches as Abbey leaves for the winter, called away by some unnameable, irresistible urge to fraternize with others of his own kind. Like the tumbleweeds, he must follow this impulse to fly, to be carried away… Read More ›